General Information

Visit

The Computer Science Department administrative offices are located in the Doyle Center, with entrance at 1052 W Loyola Ave. General Loyola visitor information is at http://www.luc.edu/visit.shtml. See the link to the Lake Shore campus map, where Doyle Center is labeled 6 (may be labeled as preschool). The main department phone number is 773-508-8150.

While the current Graduate Program Director (GPD) is often available by phone, you would do well to confirm a face to face meeting time by email, gpd@cs.luc.edu.

Department Office and Personnel

The following folks are here to help you.

Computer Science Department Personnel
Person Role Contact e-mail
Andrew N. Harrington, PhD Graduate Program Director gpd@cs.luc.edu
Konstantin Läufer, PhD Department Chair chair@cs.luc.edu
Cecilia Murphy Graduate Program Secretary cmurphy@luc.edu
Miao Ye Computer Systems Manager my@cs.luc.edu
Jeanmarie Rom Department Secretary jrom1@luc.edu

Graduate School Offices

The main office of the Graduate School is on the fourth floor of the Granada Center on the Lake Shore Campus. This office handles admissions and financial aid, and houses the permanent files of all students throughout their graduate careers. The phone number for the Graduate School is (773) 508-3396.

Graduate School Personnel
Person Role Contact e-mail
Sue Penckofer, PhD Associate Dean SPENCKO@luc.edu
Jessica Horowitz, PhD Associate Dean jhorow@luc.edu
Elaine Goetz Office Assistant egoetz@luc.edu

We strongly recommend that you contact the department faculty and staff first unless your matter absolutely requires direct Graduate School assistance, and then your contact is most likely Ms. Goetz.

Graduate Program Director

Regardless of the MS program in which you’re enrolled, your first adviser will be the Graduate Program Director (abbreviated GPD), gpd@cs.luc.edu. The current director is Dr. Andrew N. Harrington. You are expected to confer with him about your initial course of study in pursuit of your degree. You should be assigned an advisor for later semesters, to consult about the progression of your academic program. The GPD is also available for further discussion of your progress in the program and your future plans.

Student ID Cards

After registering for classes, Student ID cards, which give access to library borrowing and other privileges, are available from Corboy Law Center, 25E. Pearson or the Campus Card Office, Sullivan Center, Room 117. See http://www.luc.edu/campuscard/ for more information.

Computer Services

The University maintains several Computer Centers which are available for your use in Sullivan Center, Information Commons, and at 25 E. Pearson.

All university students are responsible for reading and following http://www.luc.edu/its/itspoliciesguidelines/policy_acceptableuse.shtml.

An account on the student email system is created automatically for each new student. Both the GPD and the Graduate School will use this account to communicate with you. It is therefore crucial that you check your Loyola e-mailbox on a regular basis. Having your e-mail forwarded to another account can be risky. Some students find the mail doesn’t always get delivered. If you find that you are not receiving regular and frequent communiqués from the Department, please notify the Secretary.

Students are encouraged to consult the Systems Handbook for more information about departmental and university computing resources. See http://syshandbook.cs.luc.edu/.

Key Web Resources

You are also encouraged to keep abreast of the following departmental web resources:

Key Department Web Sites
URL Description
http://www.luc.edu/cs Main Web Site for the CS Department
http://gradhandbook.cs.luc.edu This handbook’s permanent location
http://courses.cs.luc.edu/html Course Catalog with course descriptions and MS Programs Curriculum
http://syshandbook.cs.luc.edu Computer Systems Handbook covering labs, servers, and other computing needs
http://jobs.cs.luc.edu Informal job postings
http://blog.cs.luc.edu CS Department Blog

Summer Sessions

Summer sessions are offered through the Department each year, running from May to August. There are two 6-week sessions and an overlapping 8-week session. Three to five graduate-level courses are generally offered over these summer terms, plus:

Housing

Most graduate students choose to find their own off-campus apartments using the ads in the Reader, the Tribune, and other publicly available sources. Loyola’s Department of Residence Life also offers single- and double-occupancy apartments for graduate students on the Lakeshore Campus and the Water Tower Campus, though these fill rapidly. For additional information, please see the links in http://www.luc.edu/gradschool/gradstudcmty.shtml under Where To Live.

Transportation

Parking is available near the Water Tower Campus, although it is rather expensive. For sites listed in http://www.luc.edu/campustransportation/generalinformation/watertowercampus/ you can have your parking stub stamped at the information desk at the 25 E. Pearson building to receive a discount. As a current student, you will also want to acquaint yourself with the University’s inter-campus shuttle bus service. Public buses and the “El” run frequently between campuses and to other points in the city.

There is also parking available near the Lake Shore Campus. The main parking structure is adjacent to Sheridan Road and to the Halas Sports Center. The fee for one-day parking on campus is $7.00 or more. At peak class times, available parking can sometimes be scarce. Street parking in the community immediately surrounding campus is scarce. It is also restricted to residents during certain hours, so be sure to read the signs carefully to avoid being ticketed by the police.

Further information on parking and longer term parking permits is available at http://www.luc.edu/parking/. For information on the shuttle, see http://www.luc.edu/transportation/shuttlebus.shtml.

Publication

Research-oriented graduate students (especially those pursuing the Thesis Option in MS CS) are encouraged to pursue the publication of one or more journal articles during their graduate career. In the current job market, publication is an important means of demonstrating to prospective employers a high level of motivation and professional competence. It can also be helpful for your future pursuits as a doctoral student elsewhere.

Ways to prepare for this goal are 1) to read journals in your fields of interest regularly in order to become familiar with both current scholarship and the requirements of scholarly publication; 2) to approach seminar papers, especially those in your field(s) of interest, as potential publications, possibly even as publications targeted to a particular journal. In developing a paper for publication, students are of course well advised to work closely with their seminar instructors or faculty mentors.

Conference Presentations and Travel Funding

Presentation of conference papers is an important part of students’ professional development, and MS CS students working on a thesis in particular should aim to give at least two papers during their graduate careers — preferably including professional and not just graduate-student conferences.

Each semester the Graduate School has funds to support graduate student travel for the purpose of presenting papers or chairing sessions at conferences. Since funds are limited, students should apply immediately upon acceptance of their papers or sessions. Application is through http://gsps.luc.edu, under internal awards.

Career Center

The University’s Career Center, where each student entering the job market should establish a dossier containing letters of recommendation, is located in Sullivan Center, Room 295 (773-508-7716), with a very helpful website: http://www.luc.edu/career/RamberLink_Login.html

Students are encouraged to check our information jobs listings as well at http://jobs.cs.luc.edu. We are routinely contacted by employers who are seeking interns, consultants, and “permanent” employees.

Teaching Opportunities

In addition to occasional teaching assignments for Graduate Assistants (e.g. to help their instructor when he/she needs to be absent), a number of teaching opportunities are available to experienced graduate students and graduates who have gained experience since leaving our department (with a preference for the latter). The University requires that you have the MS degree; the Department requires that you have taken a wide range of challenging courses, especially in foundational areas such as algorithms, languages, systems, and software engineering with a solid record of achievement in all.

Department Awards

Each year the Department recognizes exceptional graduate students in all of our degree programs. Awards are given for academics and service as described in http://www.luc.edu/cs/academics/awards/.